ReVISION

20% of premature deaths after cardiac operations are a result of right ventricle dysfunction (RVD). Up to 72% of patients with RVD after surgery die. ReVISION can identify RVD risk before surgery, giving doctors and patients confidence in their decision to operate.[1]

In a typical year, cardiac surgeons perform more than 250,000 cardiac surgeries in the United States, and nearly 1,000,000 worldwide. In each of those cases, surgeons and their patients weigh the benefits of surgery against the negative outcomes that may occur. The most important of these negative outcomes is postoperative mortality risk. Current clinical guidelines ignore the right ventricle even though right ventricular dysfunction and failure are major indicators of patient mortality after cardiac surgery.[2,3]

Diagnosing RV dysfunction prior to cardiac surgery is difficult because the surgical interventions themselves, including transcatheter procedures, can deteriorate the native RV contraction pattern. Once degraded by surgery, RV dysfunction often results in premature death and/or a prolonged stay in intensive care. If doctors knew in advance which patients are at risk for post-operative RVD they could create an RV monitoring strategy for surgery to prevent damage to the RV.[4]

Today, 3D echocardiography can reveal measures such as right ventricle ejection fraction (RVEF) that have been shown to predict adverse outcomes in some patients. However, RVEF has significant limitations. Many patients with reduced RVEF have good outcomes after surgery, in situations where their RV can compensate for a decline in longitudinal shortening for example. Other patients with maintained RVEF have severe adverse outcomes, where RV dysfunction exists that RVEF does not detect.[5]

Argus Cognitive has developed a system for a deeper analysis of RV 3D echocardiographic data in order to give doctors and patients confidence in their decision to operate. ReVISION is a unique solution that separately quantifies the three major functional components that contribute to total right ventricle ejection fraction (RVEF): longitudinal shortening, radial shortening and anteroposterior shortening.

ReVISION measures longitudinal, radial and anteroposterior ejection fraction, and quantifies 3D global circumferential, longitudinal and area strains as well.

ReVISION's comprehensive quantification of RV function has significant prognostic value. In particular, studies conducted with ReVISION have shown that the measurement of the anteroposterior component of RV motion (a capability unique to ReVISION) provides independent prognostic value.[6,7]

To try ReVISION for yourself, click to see how ReVISION provides a comprehensive and quantified view of RV function.

Pricing Plans

Basic Research

$700 / month

or

$7000 / year

User accounts that can run analyses and export data: up to 3
  • Supports 1 project with a single combined dataset

  • Supports export of analysis results in table format

  • ReVISION features enabled: all

  • Included raw 3D echo DICOM uploads per month: 12 Each additional raw 3D echo DICOM upload: $30 USD

  • Delivery: software as a service via revision.arguscognitive.com

Clinical Trial

$4000 / month

or

$40000 / year

User accounts that can run analyses and export data: unlimited
  • Supports 1 project with a single combined dataset

  • Supports export of analysis results in table format

  • ReVISION features enabled: all

  • Included raw 3D echo DICOM uploads per month: 100 Each additional raw 3D echo DICOM upload: $30 USD

  • Delivery: software as a service via revision.arguscognitive.com

References

[1] Estrada, Victor et al. “Postoperative Right Ventricular Failure in Cardiac Surgery.” Cardiology Research 2016 Dec; 7(6): 185–195. https://cardiologyres.org/index.php/Cardiologyres/article/view/517

[2] https://www.sts.org/publications/sts-news/pandemic-slows-down-heart-surgery-cuts-volume-half

[3] Ternacle, Julien et al. “Prognostic value of right ventricular two-dimensional global strain in patients referred for cardiac surgery.” Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography : official publication of the American Society of Echocardiography vol. 26,7 (2013): 721-6. doi:10.1016/j.echo.2013.03.021

[4] Tokodi, Márton et al. “Right ventricular mechanical pattern in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery: a predictor of post-operative dysfunction?.” ESC heart failure vol. 7,3 (2020): 1246-1256. doi:10.1002/ehf2.12682

[5] Kovács, A., Lakatos, B., Tokodi, M. et al. Right ventricular mechanical pattern in health and disease: beyond longitudinal shortening. Heart Fail Rev 24, 511-520 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10741-019-09778-1

[6] Keller, M., Heller, T., Lang, T. et al. Acute changes of global and longitudinal right ventricular function: an exploratory analysis in patients undergoing open-chest mitral valve surgery, percutaneous mitral valve repair and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Cardiovasc Ultrasound 18, 32 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12947-020-00218-x

[7] Surkova, Elena et al. “Contraction Patterns of the Right Ventricle Associated with Different Degrees of Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction.” Circulation. Cardiovascular imaging vol. 14,10 (2021): e012774. doi:10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.121.012774